Tea Culture in the Netherlands

Tea Culture in the Netherlands

The Netherlands consumes 1.72 lb of tea per capita per year.

Dutch people love mint tea above all, but also fancy a strong Black tea and English Breakfast.

Tea to the United States arrived thanks to the Dutch exporters.

History of Tea in the Netherlands

The Netherlands imports tea since 1602 when the Dutch East India Company was established as the number one export/import business in Europe.

Besides importing all kinds of goods from China, this company also introduced tea to the country, and at that time it was so expensive that only the noble people could afford it.

By 1660, tea demand grew so much that it became widely popular among people from different social backgrounds and it turned into one of the most iconic national beverages.

Besides tea, the Dutch also imported fine porcelain teaware, creating a tea tradition that lasts even nowadays.

Tea Culture in the Netherlands

Unlike the Brits, Dutch people don’t like milk in their tea.

Many of them use tea bags instead of loose-leaf tea, and they even use the same tea bag to infuse a couple of glass cups.

Outdoor tea time in the Netherlands is a common event during the summer months, as the people here don’t see too much sun throughout the year.

Three to five cups of tea per day is a sweet spot according to Dutch people, and some drink even more than that.

Tea can be ordered in teahouses, cafes, and restaurants, but it’s most common to have a cup at someone’s home.

Dutch people pour hot water into glasses and dunk the tea bag until the water gets colored. Sugar and lime are optional.

Some people love floral tea flavors such as jasmine green tea, while other Dutchies prefer a strong Earl Grey. Sweet treats are also part of the Dutch tea ritual.

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