Tea Culture in Tanzania

Tanzania consumes half a pound of tea per capita per year.

The country produces over 35,000 tonnes of tea annually.

Black teas are the most dominant, while ginger, cinnamon, and cardamom-infused varieties are also present in Tanzania’s tea culture.

History of Tea in Tanzania

Assam is the first Black tea introduced in Tanzania in Tanga 1902 by German settlers.

Before developing the tea industry owned by foreigners, Tanzania has its own tea culture boasting moringa, rosella hibiscus, mint, and lemongrass.

After the independence of the country in 1961, many local farmers took over the small tea plantations and started developing one of the nation’s most lucrative export businesses.

Tea Culture in Tanzania

Tanzania is a home to rich tea culture, expanding from distinct Black tea varieties to moringa and mint leaves and ginger, cinnamon, and cardamom-infused beverages.

Tea plays a vital role in this African nation’s tradition, representing the natural wealth and abundance converted into a delicious loose-leaf experience.

Tea rooms and tea shops are a common thing in Tanzania where people of all ages meet to have a tasty tea accompanied by the local snack mandazi or chapatti.

Kilimanjaro Green and Kilimanjaro Black Teas are the most popular export teas from Tanzania, while Cinnamon Spice and Ginger Mint Fusion are preferred teas at home.

All tea farms in the country are organic and tea leaves are hand-picked. The majority of tea workers are women.

MIlk tea served with coconut chutney is the nation’s special, and it can be found in the oldest tea rooms in Dodoma (Tanzania’s capital).

Glass tea cups are the predominant teaware in the country, but ceramic cups can also be seen in tea shops.

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