Tea Culture in Russia

Tea Culture in Russia

Russia consumes 3 lb of tea per capita per year.

Tea is the most popular non-alcoholic beverage in the country due to the extremely low temperatures.

A strong Black cuppa with lime and sugar is an all-day ritual for these notorious tea enthusiasts.

History of Tea in Russia

In 1630, the tzar Romanov was gifted tea by a Mongolian ruler and that’s how tea was introduced to the country.

Throughout the 17th century, Chinese traders introduced other tea varieties to Russia such as Green, Oolong, Pu-erh, Rooibos, and Ceylon tea.

From being a luxury beverage at the beginning, tea gained the status of a national drink and its popularity skyrocketed throughout the years.

Tea Culture in Russia

Russian people drink tea all they long. They brew only loose-leaf tea and it has to be in a special tea kettle called samovar.

The tea is served in handcrafted porcelain tea ware and most people like to add sugar and lemon to their cup.

Adding mint leaves to a Black tea brew is also a common thing in Russia.

Some people use fruit jams to sweeten up their tea.

For many people drinking Black tea is even more important than the vodka culture.

Inviting friends for a cup of tea is the most common thing in all parts of Russia.

Even when guests are not tea fanatics, it’s impolite to reject a host as sometimes the tea gatherings can last up to three hours.

Iconic tea houses, tea shops, and cafes that serve tea all they long can be seen all across the country, especially in the big cities.

Every household has a kettle of boiling water at all times ready for a fresh brew of Black or any other tea of choice.

Sushkie is a biscuit-like traditional cookie that is always served with tea.

Russia produces both Green and Black tea on plantations open for curious visitors.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Scroll to Top